Medical

  Sun Blocker
American Academy of Dermatology
  Discovery CME
Quick Compliance/Discovery Health
  Shredding Diabetes
Ignite Health
  Breathesburg
The Star Group

Left Brain Games, Inc. has collaborated with many agencies to produce healthcare branded products.  We have built games that have filled booths at medical conferences that utilize the Wii controller or balance board.

We designed and programmed virtual worlds that included character creation and development that teaches children about skin care and behaviors.  The virtual worlds included parental controls where parents control  the amount of time that children can play daily, give rewards for good behavior, and control which games the their children can play and whom their children have contact with. 

We also developed a mobile simulation application that teaches how to use new equipment, so that the medical equipment operator can experience what they will be seeing before they actually use the new equipment on a patient.
Examples:

  • Avinger Beam - Ocelot training iPad application - This application was designed to train users in the operation of the Ocelot Device. The Ocelot is the first ever crossing catheter with real-time optical coherence tomography.
  • Ignite Health - SHREDDING DIABETES: This game does something that educational games do not usually succeed at:  It strikes a fantastic balance between informing the player and providing excellent gameplay to back it up.
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  • Ignite Health - ROAD TO A CURE - This game was developed for use at a national science fair for kids.  It was played with a Wii controller at the fair.  It shows how drug development works and the length of time it takes for development.
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  • Discovery CME - Online based classes for CME (continuing medical education) Left Brain Games, Inc. developed these creative online classes that are required as part of the yearly medical license renewals. 
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  • Benchworks - Shire - This virtual world was designed and developed to help parents and children with ADHD. 
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